Deportations and Removals

A deportation can also be called a “removal,” and is what happens when the government orders that a non-citizen is removed from the United States for any of a number of reasons. This typically occurs after an immigrant violates immigration laws, or some serious criminal laws. A deportation can also happen if a person makes a false claim

Read More

06

Jul

Waivers

There are some cases where an individual may be deemed ineligible to enter the United States, either as an immigrant or non-immigrant. In this case, it may be required to fill out an Extreme Hardship Waiver in an attempt to be eligible to enter the country.

 

One reason why someone may be said to be

Read More

06

Jul

Temporary Visas

There are many different types of temporary visas, depending on your situation and employment status. Generally speaking, a citizen of foreign country must first obtain a visa before they wish to enter the United States, no matter if it is for a temporary or permanent stay. Temporary work visas are needed for people who want to enter the

Read More

06

Jul

Residency

A person can obtain conditional permanent resident status through marriage, or through being an entrepreneur or investor. A conditional permanent resident receives a green card that is valid for two years. After that time, the resident must file a petition during the 90 days before the card expires seeking to remain a permanent resident. The conditional card cannot

Read More

06

Jul

Refugee and Asylum

Refugee or asylum status is sometimes granted to those who have either been persecuted, or fear that they will be persecuted based on a number of a different factors. Those factors are race, nationality, religion, or membership in a certain social group.

 

Refugee status is conferred on those who are of special humanitarian concern to

Read More

06

Jul

Green Cards and Immigration

Someone who is a green card holder is a person who has been granted authorization to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. To show proof of that authorization, a person is given a permanent resident card, also known as a “Green Card.” This cad gives you permission to live and work in the

Read More

06

Jul

Family Immigration Law

Intercountry adoption, or immigration through adoption, relates to the adoption of a child that is born in one country by a parent that lives in another country. Much of this intercountry adoption process is regulated by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

 

There are two separate processes that apply to children adopted by U.S. citizens,

Read More

06

Jul

Citizenship

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) allows for the change of a person’s immigration status while in the United States. For example, a person would go from a status or non-immigrant or parolee (temporary) to immigrant (indicating permanent residence). This is known as an “adjustment of status,” and occurs if the individual is inspected and admitted into the

Read More

06

Jul

Immigration Appeals and Petitions

An immigration petition may be filed by a U.S. citizen on behalf of certain family members, seeking for them to receive a green card, fiancée visa, or a K-3 or K-4 visa, based on the relationship between the U.S. citizen and the beneficiary. Petitions are for immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, such as a spouse, parent, child, or

Read More

06

Jul